Economist Radio

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Beschikbare afleveringen

  • Checks and Balance: Agenda bender

    In his first one hundred days Joe Biden looked ruthless, but his ambitious legislative agenda has since hit a wall. A series of crucial votes are expected in the coming month. Is gridlock inevitable? Sarah Binder of George Washington...
  • Press to exit: Hong Kong’s media arrests

    The raid of an outspoken pro-democracy newspaper, carried out under the city’s newish security law, has further spooked its media outlets. We ask what remains of press freedom. Our correspondent visits Europe’s and Africa’s largest...
  • The Economist Asks: John McWhorter

    What makes language offensive? The linguist and author of “Nine Nasty Words” talks to Anne McElvoy and Lane Greene, our language columnist, about the art of swearing. Is language the new cultural battlefield and does the current...
  • A hardline act to follow: Iran’s presidential election

    The supreme leader is consolidating theocratic power and ensuring a hardline legacy. Voters know they have little meaningful choice; many will simply stay home. A trial shows the life-saving power of an antibody therapy for the most...
  • Gamechangers: Trailer

    It might start with a lightbulb moment or a sudden flash of insight. But having an idea and making a success of it are very different things. It’s the difference between invention and innovation. And the path from one to the other is...
  • Money Talks: Ride shares

    The company that owns China’s leading ride-sharing app is expected to float on the stockmarket in New York next month, in what could be the biggest IPO in the world this year. We examine its ambitions and its plans to beat the...
  • Present, tense: Biden and Putin meet

    Joe Biden and Vladimir Putin have much to hammer out today—but don’t expect it to be genial. We examine what is on the table, and how each president will be judged. Competition in the cryptocurrency world is mushrooming; we ask whether...
  • Babbage: Mapping Africa

    Just 2% of the world’s human-genome catalogue represents people of African origin. A massive sequencing project aims to uncover untold genetic diversity and overlooked disease risks. Also, a new study shows intense exercise is a risk...
  • Patrons’ taint: Brazil’s pork-barrel politics

    President Jair Bolsonaro campaigned on a promise to overturn the country’s political patronage, but as his popularity has slipped he has come to need it. The latest bids to return to commercial supersonic flight look promisingly...
  • The Jab: Why was Latin America hit so hard?

    Why has Latin America been the region hardest hit by the pandemic? Carlos Castillo-Salgado of Johns Hopkins University blames the informal economy and the example set by Donald Trump. Tulane University’s Valerie Paz-Soldán explains why...
  • Promises, promises: the G7’s fuzzy climate pledges

    Where they are clear, the summit’s commitments do not add much to existing targets; mostly, though, they are woefully short on detail. We pick through the pledges. Germany is facing up to a colonial-era atrocity in modern-day Namibia,...
  • Editor’s Picks: June 14th 2021

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how green bottlenecks threaten the clean energy business, meet the voters that are turning former Labour strongholds Conservative in...